Javascript must be enabled to view this site.

Read our system requirements.

Dumblane
1 of 1

Dumblane, result 1 of 1

Item Details
Public
Available to everyone
Culture
American
Title
Dumblane
S. Hazen Bond House
Hazen Bond House
detail view
exterior
front door detail
Work Type
house
Date
Work: 1911
Era: CE
Image Date: 1989
Location
2437 15th Street, NW
Washington, District of Columbia, United States
Period
Craftsman (style)
Description
Dumblane is an historic house, located at 4120 Warren Street, Northwest, Washington, D.C. in the Tenleytown neighborhood. The American Craftsman bungalow was built in 1911, by Mr. and Mrs. F. Hazen Bond. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dumblane [Note: The entry is incorrect; the builders were Mr. & Mrs. S. Hazen Bond; see below] Gustav Stickley (1858-1942), cabinetmaker and architect, was the leader of the American arts and crafts movement. From 1901 through 1916, Stickley published a magazine called The Craftsman, which promoted the arts and crafts lifestyle. In this magazine, more than two hundred Craftsman house plans were published, targeting the American middle class. Craftsman House #10 of the 1904 series was adapted by Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Hazen Bond of Washington, D.C., in 1911, for their suburban estate which they called “Dumblane,” located at 42nd and Warren Streets, N.W., on the highest ground in the district. Stickley’s Craftsman Workshops supplied some furniture and light fixtures for the house. Samuel Hazen Bond was a lawyer, and a craftsman as well. Mr. Bond designed and hand crafted the tall case clock that stood in the foyer of Dumblane, and made some other furniture and light fixtures for the house. He was very involved, along with Stickley, during the construction process to make sure that everything was done precisely. Mr. Bond loved Dumblane so much that he had pamphlets printed that described the house and included photos from an article which appeared in The Craftsman in February 1913. Mabel Cornish Bond (Mrs. Samuel Hazen Bond) was a physician during the early 1900s, which was unusual for a woman at that time. She was also a poet, a writer, and a cat breeder. Among later owners of Dumblane were Mr. and Mrs. Sander Feldman and Mr. and Mrs. Donald Glen. Both couples made alterations to the house and grounds, which are documented and are included with the collection of original drawings. Dumblane still stands, although much of the original lot has been sold off, with additional houses built on the property. -- http://findingaid.winterthur.org/html/HTML_Finding_Aids/COL0807.htm [The blueprints are held in the Winterthur Library.]
ID Number
20110214AVRN_0019
Source
Photographer: Wilson, Richard Guy
Spatial coordinates
38.946111, -77.081944
Rights
This image has been selected and made available by a user using Artstor's software tools. Artstor has not screened or selected this image or cleared any rights to it and is acting as an online service provider pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §512. Artstor disclaims any liability associated with the use of this image. Should you have any legal objection to the use of this image, please visit http://www.artstor.org/copyright for contact information and instructions on how to proceed.
License
Use of this image is in accordance with the Artstor Terms & Conditions
File Properties
File Name
1783423.fpx
SSID
1783423

Now viewing Dumblane