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Kino Village Annual Festival held at Atago Shrine, stone lantern with Kino pottery bowl used as oil lamp inside
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Item Details
Public
Available to everyone
Title
Kino Village Annual Festival held at Atago Shrine, stone lantern with Kino pottery bowl used as oil lamp inside
Work Type
documentary photographs
Date
October 23, 1992
Location
Location: Kino; Kyoto; Kyoto; Japan; Asia
Creation/Discovery Site: Asia»Japan»Kyoto»Kyoto»Kino
Atago Jinja
Description
Work Description: ATAGO SHRINE FESTIVAL: During the Kino annual festival held at the shrine in October, Mrs. Fujiki Ichi’s pottery is prominent among the shrine’s decorations. Many of the low-fired earthenware dishes were used for lighting. Oil (in olden times that of the rape seed flower; nowadays cooking oil) is poured into the dish and a wick inserted, the free end of which was lit to create light. This was the standard form of lighting in pre-modern Japan. On the festival night, such lamp dishes are carefully placed in all the shrine’s lanterns and surround the altars. The decorations and offerings to the deities are special to Kino’s Atago Shrine alone. The festival rites are conducted by the Head Priest of Shimogamo Shrine and his accompanying priest attendants who leave immediately after the service has finished. The festival is also a coming-of-age ceremony and each year two suitable young men from Kino village serve the elders with Japanese sake from elaborate utensils. The village elders recite a special chant at various stages of the ceremony, from old texts kept in the Shrine. ATAGO SHRINE: Kino’s small village shrine is still named Atago Jinja, and was originally a sub-shrine of the main Atago Shrine located on the summit of Mount Atago in the distant Western mountains of Kyoto. After the removal of the pottery community from the Atago area to Kino, priests from Mount Atago’s shrine continued to service the community in Kino. Impracticalities of travel and distance rendered this impossible as Japan modernized, and the Kino Atago Shrine continued without any resident priests. Instead, village elders took over the daily functions of Shrine priest, a situation that continues to this day. In view of the community’s role in supplying ritual vessels to the Kamo Shrines, however, the annual festival, celebrating the traditions of the pottery community, as well as being a coming-of-age ceremony for the village youths, is today led by priests from Shimogamo Shrine. The latter’s Head Priest (guji) leads the rites. THE POTTERY VILLAGE OF KINO: The small village of Kino, located to the North-East of Iwakura on the Eizan Kurama railway line, appears to have supplied ceramic and other craft needs for the capital; such as roof tiles, ritual implements etc. From the 15th century (Muromachi period), the village became the supplier of all the vessels on which ritual offerings were made to the deities of the Kamo Shrines and the Imperial Palace. Village records attest that this pottery community had originally been located at the foot of Mount Atago in Kyoto’s western mountains, but had moved to Kino in 1467 due to the depletion of clay supplies in the Atago area. As ritual dishes used in the Kamo shrines were customarily broken after only one usage, a considerable supply had to be secured. Until the war many small kilns for the firing of these low-fired reddish earthenware ceramic dishes were a feature of many households in the village. There are believed to have been as many as 30 kilns. The dishes and plates were fashioned by a curious method, not found elsewhere in Japan. Holding the clay in the left hand, the potter’s right elbow would be used to create the required shape. Japanese ceramic scholars have verified that the same method of fashioning ceramics can be found in a village in contemporary Iran, leading to the supposition that this art moved to Japan over the ancient routes of the “Silk Road”. After the war, the techniques of making these vessels were in danger of extinction and the Shrines started to re-use the ritual offering dishes. In the late 1960s, to preserve its ceramic traditions and technology, Kino villagers reconstructed a kiln and the last living practitioner, Mrs. Fujiki Ichi, did several firings to create a stock of vessels now preserved in the Kino Village Hall (Kominkan). Mrs. Fujiki Ichi subsequently passed away around 1977, but her dishes are still used today in Kino’s annual festival.
SC Accession
498939D
SC Order
ord025535
Rights
Image and scholarly information provided by David Boggett. Cataloging provided by Smith College Imaging Center, Department of Art, Hillyer Hall, Northampton, MA 01063; Elisa Lanzi, Director; voice: 413-585-3106; fax: 413-585-3119; elanzi@smith.edu. To use this image for purposes outside of the ARTstor Terms and Conditions of Use, please contact: David Boggett, davidboggett@Yahoo.co.uk. ©David Boggett. Universal
This image was provided by Smith College; Smith College only; Limited non-commercial, educational, and personal use only.
Image and scholarly information provided by David Boggett. Cataloging provided by Smith College Imaging Center, Department of Art, Hillyer Hall, Northampton, MA 01063; To use this image for purposes outside of the ARTstor Terms and Conditions of Use, please contact: David Boggett, davidboggett@Yahoo.co.uk. ©David Boggett. Universal
This image has been selected and made available by a user using Artstor's software tools. Artstor has not screened or selected this image or cleared any rights to it and is acting as an online service provider pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §512. Artstor disclaims any liability associated with the use of this image. Should you have any legal objection to the use of this image, please visit http://www.artstor.org/copyright for contact information and instructions on how to proceed.
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File Properties
File Name
16168981.fpx
SSID
16168981

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