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Aki Matsuri (Autumn Festival) at Shimogamo Shrine, Hanjo Daikoku, Uchi-Wauri ("Movement of Fan") (fifth dance), general view of stage during performance
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Aki Matsuri (Autumn Festival) at Shimogamo Shrine, Hanjo Daikoku, Uchi-Wauri ("Movement of Fan") (fifth dance), general view of stage during performance, result 1 of 1

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Title
Aki Matsuri (Autumn Festival) at Shimogamo Shrine, Hanjo Daikoku, Uchi-Wauri ("Movement of Fan") (fifth dance), general view of stage during performance
Work Type
documentary photographs
Date
October 9, 1993
Location
Creation/Discovery Site: Asia»Japan»Kyoto»Kyoto
Shimogamo Jinja
Description
Work Description: This dance follows the Sukeroku (fourth dance). AKI MATSURI AT SHIMOGAMO: Unlike most Shimogamo festivals, the Aki Matsuri (Autumn Festival) is staged chiefly for the Shrine’s local parishioners, rather than tourists. A number of dance and musical events are staged. These vary from Bugaku dances by professionals to the accompaniment of the Shrine’s Shinto music (Gagaku) orchestra, to koto performances by some of the parishioners themselves. SHIMOGAMO SHRINE: The Kamo Shrines (Kamigamo and Shimogamo) are among the most important in Kyoto. Shimogamo was founded by the Kamo clan (possibly of immigrant origin) and is ranked as one of the oldest Shrines in Kyoto. It is dedicated to two deities. Kamotaketsunumi-no-Mikoto is the tutelary deity of the Kamo clan. He is often represented by a 3 legged crow that allegedly guided the mythological Emperor Jimmu in his move from the west to the Yamato area. The other deity is his daughter, Tamayorihime-no-Mikoto. Legend tells that one day, while bathing (whether in the Kamo River or the Izumi stream of Tadasu-no-mori is not clear), an arrow came flying down which the Princess took back home to the Shrine. At night the arrow transformed itself into a handsome young man (god) with whom the Princess conceived a child. The child, an equally good-looking young man, Kamowakeikazuchi-no-Kami flew off in a thunderbolt to become the deity of Kamigamo Shrine. The legend is depicted on Kamigamo Shrine screens and is the origin of both shrines’ association with arrows (that have thus come to be regarded as a symbol of fertility). Early animistic, or “Primitive Shinto” believed that the gods (kami) resided in rocks, tress, mountains and other natural phenomena and had to be appeased regularly with suitable offerings in order to ensure the well-being of the community. In both the Kamo Shrines, the main deities are held to reside in rocks on significant hills, outside the Shrine precincts themselves. This is unusual, in that later “Shrine Shinto” (codified around the time of the creation of the legends embodied in the Kojiki and Nihon Shoki Chronicles in the 8th century), usually considered that the various deities were resident within their own shrines. Much of the shrine grounds are covered by a forest known as the Tadasu-no-mori and within the shrine precincts are several other sub-shrines.
SC Accession
498834D
SC Order
ord025532
Rights
Image and scholarly information provided by David Boggett. Cataloging provided by Smith College Imaging Center, Department of Art, Hillyer Hall, Northampton, MA 01063; Elisa Lanzi, Director; voice: 413-585-3106; fax: 413-585-3119; elanzi@smith.edu. To use this image for purposes outside of the ARTstor Terms and Conditions of Use, please contact: David Boggett, davidboggett@Yahoo.co.uk. ©David Boggett. Universal
This image was provided by Smith College; Smith College only; Limited non-commercial, educational, and personal use only.
Image and scholarly information provided by David Boggett. Cataloging provided by Smith College Imaging Center, Department of Art, Hillyer Hall, Northampton, MA 01063; To use this image for purposes outside of the ARTstor Terms and Conditions of Use, please contact: David Boggett, davidboggett@Yahoo.co.uk. ©David Boggett. Universal
This image has been selected and made available by a user using Artstor's software tools. Artstor has not screened or selected this image or cleared any rights to it and is acting as an online service provider pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §512. Artstor disclaims any liability associated with the use of this image. Should you have any legal objection to the use of this image, please visit http://www.artstor.org/copyright for contact information and instructions on how to proceed.
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File Properties
File Name
16161544.fpx
SSID
16161544

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