Javascript must be enabled to view this site.

Read our system requirements.

Coffin Base of a Priestly Official
1 of 1

Coffin Base of a Priestly Official, result 1 of 1

Item Details
Public
Available to everyone
Culture
Egyptian
Title
Coffin Base of a Priestly Official
Date
1076-944 BC
Location
Creation Site: Egypt
Material
Wood, painted gesso
Period
Third Intermediate Period, Dynasty 21
Measurements
73 5/8 x 21 1/4 x 11 in. (187 x 54 x 27.9 cm)
Description
This coffin appears to have been made for a priestly official in the temple of Amun at Karnak, but it was never finished. The hieroglyphic text that would have recorded the name of the owner was left blank, although it does bear the titles of priest ("god's father") and scribe. In addition, the coffin never received its outer coat of yellow varnish, leaving the colors, particularly the "Egyptian blue," as vivid as the day they were painted. While most colors used by the ancient Egyptians were simple mineral pigments, this bright blue is a ground glass-frit colored with copper. This process produced a remarkably stable blue and was prized throughout the ancient world. The sides of the coffin have been painted in a broad and lively hand, made more vivid by the lack of surface coating. Unfortunately, probably due to this lack of protection, the painted gesso surface of the lid has been almost entirely lost, leaving nothing but bare wood. The head end decoration has also been lost, but fortunately the sides are well preserved and include scenes of Hathor of Deir el-Bahri and other gods and goddesses, including Re, Osiris, Anubis, and Nut. On the proper left, beginning at the foot end, is a depiction of a pyramid-topped tomb in the desert with a large image of a Hathor cow in front. After this are images of Osiris, Isis, and Nephthys worshipping the Abydos fetish and images of Re, Osiris, and the goddess of the west adoring another Abydos fetish. On the proper left side of the coffin are images of Nut and Osiris, Anubis, Osiris, Re, and a winged scarab over a depiction of the evil serpent Apophis, his body cut with many knives. At the foot end is another rendering of a pyramid-topped tomb with a Hathor cow, here fronted by an image of Anubis. The interior painting is largely obscured by remains of the mummy wrappings stuck with resin, although traces of an image of the Goddess of the West are still visible on the floor. The resin also seeped into, and discolored, the sides of the coffin. However, the images still visible on the interior sides were boldly drawn with figures of Osiris and gods of the underworld and with an image of a ba-bird with outstretched wings at the head end of the coffin.
Repository
Michael C. Carlos Museum, Emory University
Accession Number
1999.001.013 A
Source
Charlotte Lichirie Collection of Egyptian Art
Photographer: Peter Harholdt
Published References
Peter Lacovara and Betsy Teasley Trope, The Realm of Osiris (Atlanta: Michael C. Carlos Museum, 2001), 48.
Darrah Johnson-McDaniel, Christopher A. Barrett, Asma Sharafi, and Tina T. Salguero, "Nanoscience of an Ancient Pigment," Journal of the American Chemical Society 135 (2013): 1677-1679.
Exhibition History
MCCM Permanent Collection Gallery, 2001 - Present
On View
Yes
Rights
© Michael C. Carlos Museum, Emory University. Photo by Peter Harholdt.
This image is provided by the Michael C. Carlos Museum of Emory University. This image is available under the ArtStor Digital Library Terms and Conditions of Use only. For all other uses, please contact the Michael C. Carlos Museum Office of Collections Services at +1(404) 727-4282 or mccm.collections.services@emory.edu. The Museum assumes no responsibility for royalties or fees claimed by the artist or third parties. The User agrees to indemnify and hold harmless Emory University, its Michael C. Carlos Museum, its agents, employees, faculty members, students and trustees from and against any and all claims, losses, actions, damages, expenses, and all other liabilities, including but not limited to attorney’s fees, directly or indirectly arising out of or resulting from its use of photographic images for which permission is granted hereunder.
This image is provided by the Michael C. Carlos Museum of Emory University. This image is available under the ArtStor Digital Library Terms and Conditions of Use only. For all other uses, please contact the Michael C. Carlos Museum Office of Collections Services at +1(404) 727-4282 or mccm.collections.services@emory.edu. The Museum assumes no responsibility for royalties or fees claimed by the artist or third parties. The User agrees to indemnify and hold harmless Emory University, its Michael C. Carlos Museum, its agents, employees, faculty members, students and trustees from and against any and all claims, losses, actions, damages, expenses, and all other liabilities, including but not limited to attorney’s fees, directly or indirectly arising out of or resulting from its use of photographic images for which permission is granted hereunder.
This image has been selected and made available by a user using Artstor's software tools. Artstor has not screened or selected this image or cleared any rights to it and is acting as an online service provider pursuant to 17 U.S.C. §512. Artstor disclaims any liability associated with the use of this image. Should you have any legal objection to the use of this image, please visit http://www.artstor.org/copyright for contact information and instructions on how to proceed.
License
Use of this image is in accordance with the Artstor Terms & Conditions
File Properties
File Name
11008283.fpx
SSID
11008283

Now viewing Coffin Base of a Priestly Official