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A. von Kreling. Goethes [Goethe's] Faust. VIII. Gretchen [Margaret] von der Mater dolorosa [Gretchen [Margaret] at the Lady of Sorrows] 1968; verso: F. A. Ackermann's Kunstverlag, Munchen. Serie 167: A v. Kreling, Goethes Faust (12 Karten) [divided back, no message]
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A. von Kreling. Goethes [Goethe's] Faust. VIII. Gretchen [Margaret] von der Mater dolorosa [Gretchen [Margaret] at the Lady of Sorrows] 1968; verso: F. A. Ackermann's Kunstverlag, Munchen. Serie 167: A v. Kreling, Goethes Faust (12 Karten) [divided back, no message], result 1 of 1

Item Details
Public
Available to everyone
Culture
German
Title
A. von Kreling. Goethes [Goethe's] Faust. VIII. Gretchen [Margaret] von der Mater dolorosa [Gretchen [Margaret] at the Lady of Sorrows] 1968; verso: F. A. Ackermann's Kunstverlag, Munchen. Serie 167: A v. Kreling, Goethes Faust (12 Karten) [divided back, no message]
overall
recto
Work Type
Picture postcard
Date
ca.1907-1914 (publication date)
Material
paper
cardstock
Measurements
14 x 9 cm (5.51 x 3.54 inches) approximately
Description
Goethe's Faust is a hybrid between a play and an extended poem. The story concerns the fate of Faust in his quest for the true essence of life. Frustrated with learning and the limits to his knowledge, power, and enjoyment of life, he attracts the attention of the Devil (represented by Mephistopheles), who makes a bet with Faust that he will be able to satisfy him. In the first part, Mephistopheles leads Faust through experiences that culminate in a lustful relationship with Gretchen, an innocent young woman. Gretchen and her family are destroyed by Mephistopheles' deceptions and Faust's desires. Part one of the story ends in tragedy for Faust, as Gretchen is saved but Faust is left to grieve in shame. The second part begins with the spirits of the earth forgiving Faust (and the rest of mankind) and progresses into allegorical poetry. Faust and his Devil pass through and manipulate the world of politics and the world of the classical gods, and meet with Helen of Troy (the personification of beauty). Finally, having succeeded in taming the very forces of war and nature, Faust experiences a singular moment of happiness. Mephistopheles tries to seize Faust's soul when he dies after this moment of happiness, but is frustrated and enraged when angels intervene due to God's grace (Wikipedia).
Repository
Trinity College, Watkinson Library (Hartford, Connecticut, USA)
Accession Number
Box 10.186-8
ID Number
540382
Source
Trinity College Library
Vendor: Trinity College Watkinson Library
Rights
This digital collection and its contents are made available by Trinity College Library for limited non-commercial, educational and personal use only. For other uses, or for additional information regarding the collection, contact the staff of Watkinson Library (www.watkinsonlibrary.org).
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License
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File Properties
File Name
540382.jpg
SSID
13046682

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