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Edfu, Relief with Pharaoh and his boat
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Edfu, Relief with Pharaoh and his boat, result 1 of 1

Item Details
Public
Available to everyone
Culture
Egyptian
Title
Edfu, Relief with Pharaoh and his boat
Work Type
Temple; photographs
Location
Egypt, Idfu (Edfu)
Material
black and white photography
Measurements
26.5 x 20.7 cm
Description
Temple of Horus at Edfu is the most completely preserved of all Egyptian temples, dating mainly to the Ptolemaic period. To the east of the temple are the ruins of a city (now covered by modern Idfū) dating back at least to the Old Kingdom (c. 2575–c. 2150 BCE). The Temple of Horus was built and decorated by the Ptolemies. Horus of Behdet was a divine metaphor for the living king who, having vanquished the enemy, ruled as the victorious winged sun-disc. The building of the Temple of Horus began in 237 BCE, the 10th year of the reign of Ptolemy III Euergetes I (reg 246–221 BCE), and its interior was decorated by Ptolemy IV Philopator (reg 221–205 BCE) and Ptolemy VI Philometor (reg 180–145 BCE). The pronaos (traditionally called the outer hypostyle hall) was built on to the existing temple by Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II and decorated between 140 and 124 BCE. This annexed pronaos emulated the one that his brother Ptolemy VI had built on to the Temple of Isis at Philae. Subsequently, the colonnaded forecourt, pylon and enclosure wall were built and decorated by Ptolemy IX Soter II, Ptolemy X Alexander I and Ptolemy XII Neos Dionysos. The interior decoration of both monuments is executed in wafer-thin raised relief except on columns, and the exterior decoration, which was addressed late in the Ptolemaic period, is boldly carved within sunken contours. The principles of Egyptian temple decoration, which first became apparent to scholars at Edfu, reveal certain visual and textual repetitions, alterations and substitutions on one or more architectural members or on coherent groups of surfaces. The remarkable theological cohesion and symmetry of representations are taken to imply premeditation by the theologians and the use of pattern books and cartoons.Grove Dictionary of Art
Repository
Washington University (Saint Louis, Mo.) Art & Architecture Library
Source
Volume 16: Philae/Edfou Page 46
Variant Title
Edfou
Image Materials/Technique
albumen paper
Inscription
on album page, lower left, in pencil: 64; on album page, lower left, in black ink: Edfou. La Chasse de Ramesses
Rights
Permission to use, copy and distribute is hereby granted for non-commercial and education purposes only, following fair use guidelines.
Permission to use, copy and distribute is hereby granted for non-commercial and education purposes only, following fair use guidelines
Permission to use, copy and distribute is hereby granted for non-commercial and education purposes only, following fair use guidelines
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License
Use of this image is in accordance with the applicable Terms & Conditions
File Properties
File Name
1355946.fpx
SSID
1355946

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