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South African Museum of Military History
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South African Museum of Military History, result 1 of 1

Item Details
Public
Available to everyone
Culture
South African
Title
South African Museum of Military History
South African National Anglo-Boer War Memorial
Detail of Aronson’s sculpture “Angel of Peace”
Exterior
Work Type
monuments
Date
1913
Image: 07/19/2018
Location
02 Erlswold Way, Johannesburg, 2132, South Africa
Johannesburg, Gauteng, South Africa
Latitude: 26.164 S
Longitude: 28.041 E
Material
Stone; cast bronze
Period
Neoclassical
Measurements
~ 20 meters high
Description
A classicizing monument designed by British colonial architect Edwin Lutyens, topped with a bronze statue by Russian sculptor Naoum Aronson called “Angel of Peace.” Lutyens looked to Roman triumphal arches as inspiration for this work. It is located on 4 hectares of land given to the people of Johannesburg by the Johannesburg Town Council, which allows for several sweeping vistas of the monument. This view highlights Aronson’s sculpture atop the triumphal arch.
Commentary: This monumental stone memorial served as a precedent for many of the classicizing memorials constructed after World War I. This might also be seen as a precursor to the abstracted classicism later employed by Lutyens in colonial India. The monument was originally dedicated in 1913 to the “Men of Rand Regiments who fell in the South African War 1899-1902” but was dedicated on October 10, 1999 to the “Memory of the men, women, and children of all races and nations who lost their lives in the Anglo-Boer War 1899-1902.” Today, the memorial stands near the entrance to the South African Museum of Military History.
Source
Information: Historical plaque at memorial site.
Photographer: Sarah Rovang
Rights
Sarah Rovang 2018
License
Use of this image is in accordance with the Artstor Terms & Conditions
File Properties
File Name
2018SKR0719003.jpg
SSID
24000950

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