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Early pendulum clock by Salomon Coster, c.1657.
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Early pendulum clock by Salomon Coster, c.1657., result 1 of 1

Item Details
Open Artstor
Available to everyone
Title
Early pendulum clock by Salomon Coster, c.1657.
Haagsche Klokje by Salomon Coster (1657-59)
Work Type
Time Measurement
Date
1657-1659
Location
The Hague
Material
brass (copper, zinc alloy); glass; mahogany (wood); steel (metal)
Measurements
Overall: 255 mm x 210 mm x 90 mm, 2.045 kg
Description
Haagsche Klokje by Salomon Coster (1657-59); Haagsche Klokje by Salomon Coster (1657-59).; This clock by Salomon Coster (d. 1659) of The Hague is one of the earliest pendulum clocks ever made. The Dutch scientist Christiaan Huygens (1629-1693) made the first successful pendulum clock in December 1656 and in the following year he granted Coster the sole right to make them. In effect Huygens had used a pendulum to control a conventional spring-driven clock with a verge escapement by turning it on its side and coupling the oscillating action produced by the verge to the pendulum. This resulted in the pendulum swinging through a wide arc and Huygens was aware that the pendulum was not completely isochronous, i.e. the clock would run slightly slower as the arc increased. He proposed to overcome this defect by fitting cheeks at the pendulum suspension point which would progressively reduce the effective length of the pendulum as the arc increased. All these features are present in the Coster clock.; This clock by Salomon Coster (d. 1659) of The Hague is one of the earliest pendulum clocks ever made. The Dutch scientist Christiaan Huygens (1629-1693) made the first successful pendulum clock in December 1656 and in the following year he granted Coster the sole right to make them. In effect Huygens had used a pendulum to control a conventional spring-driven clock with a verge escapement by turning it on its side and coupling the oscillating action produced by the verge to the pendulum. This resulted in the pendulum swinging through a wide arc and Huygens was aware that the pendulum was not completely isochronous, i.e. the clock would run slightly slower as the arc increased. He proposed to overcome this defect by fitting cheeks at the pendulum suspension point which would progressively reduce the effective length of the pendulum as the arc increased. All these features are present in the Coster clock.
Repository
Science Museum, Special Exhibition Gallery 1: The Sun
ID Number
co1031
Source
Image and original data from Science Museum Group - https://collection.sciencemuseum.org.uk
Rights
The source metadata displayed in the Description field is released under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license - https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. All other source metadata is released under Creative Commons Zero - https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/. The image is released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 License - https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/.
File Properties
File Name
large_1980_0108__0010_.jpg
SSID
26293809

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