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Page from Tales of a Parrot (Tuti-nama): Fifth night: The monkey slain, his blood to be used as medicine for the ailing prince he has bitten
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Page from Tales of a Parrot (Tuti-nama): Fifth night: The monkey slain, his blood to be used as medicine for the ailing prince he has bitten, result 1 of 1

Item Details
Open Artstor
Available to everyone
Culture
India, Mughal, Reign of Akbar, 16th century
Title
Page from Tales of a Parrot (Tuti-nama): Fifth night: The monkey slain, his blood to be used as medicine for the ailing prince he has bitten
See all records within the set
Work Type
Painting
Date
c. 1560
Material
opaque watercolor, ink and gold on paper
Description
Wounded by the chess-playing monkey’s bite, the prince’s hand became increasingly infected. The only cure, his doctors said, was to apply the blood of the monkey to the wound and let it dry. Reluctantly, the prince allowed the monkey to be killed. Two men accomplish this serious work at the left.
In the right margin is written the name of the artist, the celebrated Basavana. The Tuti-nama contains the earliest known paintings by the prolific master who was instrumental in shaping the Mughal painting style over subsequent decades.
Under the covers is the hand that got infected from the monkey bite.
Repository
Cleveland, Ohio, USA
Collection: Indian Art
Department: Indian and South East Asian Art
Provenance: Estate of Breckenridge Long, Bowie, MD, 1959; Harry Burke Antiques, Philadelphia, PA; Bernard Brown, Milwaukee, WI;
Gift of Mrs. A. Dean Perry
Accession Number
Source
Image and original data from The Cleveland Museum of Art
License
Use of this image is in accordance with the Artstor Terms & Conditions
File Properties
File Name
1962.279.33.b_full.tif
SSID
24605419

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