Javascript must be enabled to view this site.

Read our system requirements.

Akasaka Palace (Crown Prince’s Building, State Guest House)
1 of 1

Akasaka Palace (Crown Prince’s Building, State Guest House), result 1 of 1

Item Details
Public
Available to everyone
Culture
Meiji
Title
Akasaka Palace (Crown Prince’s Building, State Guest House)
Exterior lamp and balustrade
Exterior
Detail View
Work Type
imperial palaces
Date
1899-1909
Image: November 5, 2018
Location
2-1-1 Moto-akasaka, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan
Tokyo, Tōkyō, Kanto, Japan
Latitude: 35.681 N
Longitude: 139.729 E
Material
brick, steel frame, stone cladding, wrought iron
Period
Neo-Baroque/Meiji Era
Measurements
15,000 sq. meters
Description
Detail showing an outdoor lamp at the Akasaka Palace. The motifs of vines and growth recall the fluid lines of contemporary Art Nouveau.
Commentary: Architect Dr. Tokuma Katayama (1854-1917) studied under British architect Josiah Conder (1852-1926), who served as an advisor to the Meiji government. Katayama’s design combines Japanese motifs with formal references to European precedents, including the Palace of Versailles, the New Palace in Vienna, the Louvre Palace, and Buckingham Palace. The glass, copper, and wrought iron awnings over some of the doors also recall the popular Art Nouveau style of this period, a movement which itself had origins in japonisme. Japanese iconography and cultural references can be seen on the interior and exterior in the choice of art and symbolism, as well as the roof design. The interiors draw largely from French precedents, as does the landscaping and fountains surrounding the main building. Katayama also employed modern structural techniques to ensure that the building was fireproof and earthquake-proof, using a structure of brick around a steel frame underneath the stone cladding visible on the outside. The entire building was restored between 1967 and 1974, and again between 2006 and 2009. Today it serves as the Japanese government’s State Guest House, hosting visiting politicians and dignitaries, as well as major diplomatic events.
Source
Contributor: Sarah Rovang
Information: “A Brief History of the Akasaka State Guest House,” pamphlet distributed onsite.
Photographer: Sarah Rovang
Historic Designation
National
Rights
Sarah Rovang, 2018
License
Use of this image is in accordance with the applicable Terms & Conditions
File Properties
File Name
1105SKR0218_11.jpg
SSID
24563260

Now viewing Akasaka Palace (Crown Prince’s Building, State Guest House)